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Sports Jules Bianchi will not give up after Japan accident, says his father

Marussia's Jules Bianchi "will not give up" despite remaining in a critical condition after crashing at the Japanese GP, says his father Philippe. Everyone keeps asking me how Jules is but I can't reply, there is no answer. "I was very sad when he got hurt," said Philippe. "I kept wondering, like every one else 'Why don't they tell us more about how he is?'. "But now I'm in the same position I understand.

Marussia's Jules Bianchi "will not give up" despite remaining in a critical condition after crashing at the Japanese GP, says his father Philippe.

The Frenchman, 25, suffered severe head injuries when he collided with a recovery vehicle at Suzuka.

"The situation is desperate," said Philippe Bianchi. "Every time the telephone goes, we know it could be the hospital to tell us that Jules is dead.

"He will not give up, I'm sure of that. I can see it. I believe it."

He added in an interview with Italian paper La Gazzetta dello Sport: "I speak to him. I know he can hear me.

"His doctors have told us that this is already a miracle, no one has ever survived such a serious accident. But Jules won't give-up.

"His trainer Andrea says that if there is one person who can make it happen with his will, it's Jules."

Philippe said the family have been touched by the show of support from other Formula 1 drivers, who gathered at the front of the grid ahead of the Russian Grand Prix, arms around each other's shoulders, forming a 'circle of solidarity' for Jules.

"I've never seen anything like that," said Philippe. "It touched us very deeply. We thank every one of them. So many of them have been in touch, written to me; [Fernando] Alonso, [Jean-Eric] Vergne, [Felipe] Massa have given strong messages.

"Hamilton wrote me a beautiful email in which he says that if there is anything he can do, he's there. Rossi and Marquez from Moto GP too."

Philippe also said that he is using the accident of seven-time world champion Michael Schumacher, who continues his recovery at home after suffering a head injury in a skiing accident in December, as a reference point.

"I was very sad when he got hurt," said Philippe. "I kept wondering, like every one else 'Why don't they tell us more about how he is?'.

"But now I'm in the same position I understand. Everyone keeps asking me how Jules is but I can't reply, there is no answer. It's very serious, but he's stable.

"One day he seems a bit better, other days a bit worse. The doctors don't say. The damage from the accident is very bad but we don't know how it will evolve.

"Even with Schumacher it took months to come out of the coma. [FIA president] Jean Todt said he hopes Michael will one day be able to have a normal life. One day I hope we can say the same about Jules."

He added: "It's tough. In a week the life of this family has been destroyed. What are we doing here? Living a nightmare in a place very far from home.

"But when Jules gets a bit better we can transfer him, maybe to Tokyo and things will be a bit easier. But who knows when that will happen. If it will happen. We have no certainties, we just have to wait."

BBC
14/10
0 Points
1

Michael Schumacher is 'waking up slowly', reveals son

He needs time and peace.' Schumacher is being cared for by a team of 15 experts at his home. It is understood he remains immobile and unable to speak.His care is estimated to be costing his family 100,000 pounds per month.At the end of the year his father Rolf is moving from his home in Germany into a specially constructed residence built for him in the grounds of the 35 million pound Schumacher mansion at Gland, on the shores of Lake Geneva.

Kart-racing driver, Mick Schumacher said his father was getting better "very slowly."

French F1 commentator Jean-Louis Moncet told Europe 1 radio station: "I saw his son and he told me that Schumi is waking up very slowly; very slowly.

"Although things are going at a slow pace, he has a lot of time, I would say he has his whole life in front of him to get back on track."

Moncet, 69, also cast new light on the manner in which Schumacher was injured when he fell and struck a rock whilst skiing with Mick in the French Alps on December 29.

"The problem for Michael was not the hit, but the mounting of the Go-Pro camera that he had on his helmet that injured his brain," said Moncet.

Moncet confirmed that Moncet was still "fighting" at his Swiss mansion, where he is being cared for in a purpose-built medical suite.

The seven times world champion returned to his home with his wife and children two months ago after being discharged from a rehabilitation clinic in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Schumacher spent time in the rehab clinic after coming out of his medically-induced coma following the accident, which left him with catastrophic brain injuries.

Former Ferrari boss Jean Todt visited Schumacher last month, saying: 'What's important is that he lives and that his family is with him. We really believe that things will get better. He needs time and to be left alone.

'In the past weeks and months, he has made progress in relation to the severity of his injury,' said Todt, now president of the International Automobile Federation.

'But a long and hard road is in front of him. Hopefully things will improve. His family is close to him. He needs time and peace.' Schumacher is being cared for by a team of 15 experts at his home. It is understood he remains immobile and unable to speak.

His care is estimated to be costing his family 100,000 pounds per month.

At the end of the year his father Rolf is moving from his home in Germany into a specially constructed residence built for him in the grounds of the 35 million pound Schumacher mansion at Gland, on the shores of Lake Geneva.

Express
11/10
19 Points
1

BREAKING NEWS: Michael Schumacher can lead 'relatively normal life again'

Jean Todt, head of the sport's governing body the FIA, is believed to have visited the seven-time world champion at his home in Switzerland last week.

The 68-year-old said Schumacher's condition is "improving" but added that he would "never" be able to drive a F1 car again.

Mr Todt said: "We may assume that Schumacher can live a relatively normal life within a short period of time.

"What we can say is that he will probably never again drive a Formula One car."

Mr Todt was the General Manager of the Ferrari F1 team when Schumacher won five world titles with the iconic Italian set-up.

He is believed to have visited the 45-year-old last week before the start of the Japanese Grand Prix, according to Belgian broadcaster RTL.

The race saw Marussia driver Jules Bianchi suffer severe head injuries after a crash during wet conditions at the Suzuka race circuit.

Mr Todt added: "[Schumacher] fights. His condition improves, which is very important as is the fact that he is now home with his family."

Last month Schumacher moved from a hospital in Grenoble where he was treated for six months to his home in Lausanne.

The move came after he awoke from a medically-induced coma and he is continuing his recovery surrounded by his family.

Schumacher was rushed to hospital last December when he hit his head on a rock while skiing in the French resort of Meribel on December 29.

The most successful driver in F1 was left with serious head injuries and needed to be operated on in the aftermath of the accident.

In the last official update on his health condition Schumacher's manager Sabine Kehm said the ex-Ferrari and Mercedes driver had made good progress "in the past weeks and months".

She added: "Henceforth, Michael’s rehabilitation will take place at his home.

"Considering the severe injuries he suffered, progress has been made in the past weeks and months. There is still, however, a long and difficult road ahead.

"We would like to extend our gratitude to the entire team at the CHUV Lausanne for their thorough and competent work.

 

"We ask that the privacy of Michael’s family continue to be respected, and that speculations about his state of health are avoided."

Schumacher's wife, Corinna, also said in September that her husband was "getting better, slowly certainly, but in any case he's improving."

Express
07/10
12 Points
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