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'We have made it through the hardest times': Michael Schumacher's wife thanks his fans

Corinna chose the German Grand Prix to pay tribute to the unfailing loyalty and good wishes from the public amid reports that the Formula 1 champion could be home by the summer.

She said: "The German Grand Prix gives me the perfect opportunity to cordially thank you all for the good wishes and positive energies you keep sending to Michael.

"I have to say your sympathies blew us all away.

“It is good to know that together we made it through the hardest time.

"Now we are facing a phase which will presumably take a long time."

Her heartfelt words came hours before a Swiss newspaper claimed that 45-year-old sports star could be home with his family by the end of the summer after making good progress at a Lausanne rehabilitation clinic.

He was transferred their last month after spending 170 days at a hospital in Grenoble, France, following a skiing accident last year.

SonntagsBlick said: "There are signs that Michael will leave the clinic soon and be cared for at home."

Doctors at the Lausanne clinic are hopeful that Schumacher will be able to use an advanced electronic wheelchair, which will be controlled by his mouth, within a few weeks.

Four months ago it was reported that his wife and family had transformed their mansion home in Gland in preparation for his return.

They have allegedly invested in a personal medical centre, specialist machines, a building for carers to live in and another extension with no steps to help care for the racing ace.

Schumacher met Corinna in 1991 on the Formula 1 circuit.

She was previously married to racing driver Heinz-Harald Frentzen.

Schumacher woke from his medically induced coma last month after suffering from head injuries while skiing on December 29 in the French Alps.

Reports suggest that he remains paralysed and communicates with his family, including daughter Gina-Maria, 17, and son Mick, 15, by moving his eyes.

However, medical experts remain uncertain about a full recovery for Schumacher.

Dr Erich Riederer, a neurologist, told online news site 20 Minuten: "He will remain an invalid all his life and will always remain dependent on the help of others."

Express
21/07
2 Points

Michael Schumacher: Wife Says F1 Legend Is 'Getting Better'

Michael Schumacher's wife claims the seven-times Formula One world champion is "getting better slowly" after spending six months in a coma following head injuries sustained in a skiing accident.

Schumacher was transferred from a hospital in Grenoble in June, almost six months after he was placed in a medically induced coma, and moved to the University Hospital in Lausanne closer to his home.

The 45-year-old is currently undergoing what was described at the time as "a long phase of rehabilitation".

This has allowed wife Corinna to make her first public appearance this week since her husband was involved in the accident in the French Alpine resort of Meribel.

Speaking to German women's magazine, Neue Post, Corinna was quoted as saying: "It's getting better, slowly certainly, but in any case it's improving."

The Huffington Post
12/07
17 Points

Sports Michael Schumacher: Wife Says F1 Legend Is 'Getting Better'

Michael Schumacher's wife claims the seven-times Formula One world champion is "getting better slowly" after spending six months in a coma following head injuries sustained in a skiing accident.

Schumacher was transferred from a hospital in Grenoble in June, almost six months after he was placed in a medically induced coma, and moved to the University Hospital in Lausanne closer to his home.

The 45-year-old is currently undergoing what was described at the time as "a long phase of rehabilitation".

This has allowed wife Corinna to make her first public appearance this week since her husband was involved in the accident in the French Alpine resort of Meribel.

Speaking to German women's magazine, Neue Post, Corinna was quoted as saying: "It's getting better, slowly certainly, but in any case it's improving."

The Huffington Post
11/07
3 Points

Michael Schumacher: Wife Says F1 Legend Is 'Getting Better'

Michael Schumacher's wife claims the seven-times Formula One world champion is "getting better slowly" after spending six months in a coma following head injuries sustained in a skiing accident.

Schumacher was transferred from a hospital in Grenoble in June, almost six months after he was placed in a medically induced coma, and moved to the University Hospital in Lausanne closer to his home.

The 45-year-old is currently undergoing what was described at the time as "a long phase of rehabilitation".

This has allowed wife Corinna to make her first public appearance this week since her husband was involved in the accident in the French Alpine resort of Meribel.

Speaking to German women's magazine, Neue Post, Corinna was quoted as saying: "It's getting better, slowly certainly, but in any case it's improving."

The Huffington Post
11/07
1 Points
1

Michael Schumacher is 'getting better' slowly, reveals wife Corinna

MICHAEL Schumacher is "getting better", according to his wife CorinnaSpeaking publicly for the first time since her husband's skiing accident at the end of last year, Mrs Schumacher said the improvement was "encouraging". The 45-year-old Formula 1 champion spent 170 days in hospital in Grenoble in France after cracking his skull on a rock while skiing in the Alpine resort of Meribel.

MICHAEL Schumacher is "getting better", according to his wife Corinna

Speaking publicly for the first time since her husband's skiing accident at the end of last year, Mrs Schumacher said the improvement was "encouraging". 

The 45-year-old Formula 1 champion spent 170 days in hospital in Grenoble in France after cracking his skull on a rock while skiing in the Alpine resort of Meribel. He spent most of that time in a coma and is believed to have lost more than three stone in weight. 

Last month he was transferred from the hospital to a rehabilitation clinic in Lausanne, Switzerland, which is just 24 miles away from the couple's family home. 

Speaking to German women's weekly magazine Neue Post at a horse-riding tournament in Germany, Mrs Schumacher said: "It's getting better, slowly certainly, but in any case it's improving."

According to his manager Sabine Kehm, Schumacher is "no longer in a coma", but is involved in a long process of rehabilitation. There has been little in the way of official statements about his condition. 

There have been reports that the racing star has been responding mostly to the sound of his wife's voice. 

However, despite the speculation about his recovery, medical experts remain sceptical about a full recovery for Schumacher

Dr Erich Riederer, a Zurich-based neurologist who works with coma patients, told Swiss online news site 20 Minuten: "He will remain an invalid all his life and will always remain dependent on the help of others." 

It emerged last month that a medical report on Schumacher had been stolen and offered for sale to the media for tens of thousands of pounds. 

Express
11/07
4 Points
1 2 3

Schumacher files: Swiss firm Rega requests investigation

His medical documents were shared with the medical and rescue teams involved in planning his move, including Rega.Schumacher's manager, Sabine Kehm, said last month that the F1 ex-champion's medical files had been "clearly stolen" and were being offered for sale.

A Swiss air rescue service has lodged a legal complaint after its computer was apparently linked to a bid to sell Michael Schumacher's medical file.

Rega said it had asked Swiss prosecutors to investigate, but believed its staff were not involved.

The ex-F1 champion suffered a head injury in a skiing accident last December and was moved to a Swiss hospital last month.

His records were allegedly stolen and offered for sale to several newspapers.

Schumacher, 45, was transferred on 16 June from a hospital in the French city of Grenoble to Lausanne in Switzerland.

His medical documents were shared with the medical and rescue teams involved in planning his move, including Rega.

Schumacher's manager, Sabine Kehm, said last month that the F1 ex-champion's medical files had been "clearly stolen" and were being offered for sale.

The records were apparently being offered to media across Europe for 50,000 euros (£40,000, $68,000).

Ms Kehm warned that criminal charges would be pressed if such "confidential files" were bought or published.

On Monday, French police said they had tracked down the IP address of a computer used to share his medical records to a Swiss helicopter firm.

In a statement in French, Rega said it had "found itself at the centre of speculation" as a result of revelations published by French daily Dauphine Libere that the information was sent from one of the computers of an "important helicopter company based in Zurich".

It had filed a complaint with prosecutors in Zurich to ensure "absolute clarity" in this case, it said.

"Rega has no evidence that any of its employees failed in this regard. At this stage, we assume that the rights of the patient to medical confidentiality have been preserved."

The company also said it had no knowledge of the ongoing inquiries being conducted by the authorities.

Michael Schumacher retired from racing in 2012 after a 19-year career.

The investigation into his accident at the Meribel resort on 29 December said he had been skiing off-piste when he fell and hit a rock.

He had been going at the speed of "a very good skier" at the time, they said.

His family has said very little about his medical progress, preferring to avoid the gaze of the international media.

BBC
09/07
12 Points
1 2 3

Schumacher files: Swiss firm Rega requests investigation

His medical documents were shared with the medical and rescue teams involved in planning his move, including Rega.Schumacher's manager, Sabine Kehm, said last month that the F1 ex-champion's medical files had been "clearly stolen" and were being offered for sale.

A Swiss air rescue service has lodged a legal complaint after its computer was apparently linked to a bid to sell Michael Schumacher's medical file.

Rega said it had asked Swiss prosecutors to investigate, but believed its staff were not involved.

The ex-F1 champion suffered a head injury in a skiing accident last December and was moved to a Swiss hospital last month.

His records were allegedly stolen and offered for sale to several newspapers.

Schumacher, 45, was transferred on 16 June from a hospital in the French city of Grenoble to Lausanne in Switzerland.

His medical documents were shared with the medical and rescue teams involved in planning his move, including Rega.

Schumacher's manager, Sabine Kehm, said last month that the F1 ex-champion's medical files had been "clearly stolen" and were being offered for sale.

The records were apparently being offered to media across Europe for 50,000 euros (£40,000, $68,000).

Ms Kehm warned that criminal charges would be pressed if such "confidential files" were bought or published.

On Monday, French police said they had tracked down the IP address of a computer used to share his medical records to a Swiss helicopter firm.

In a statement in French, Rega said it had "found itself at the centre of speculation" as a result of revelations published by French daily Dauphine Libere that the information was sent from one of the computers of an "important helicopter company based in Zurich".

It had filed a complaint with prosecutors in Zurich to ensure "absolute clarity" in this case, it said.

"Rega has no evidence that any of its employees failed in this regard. At this stage, we assume that the rights of the patient to medical confidentiality have been preserved."

The company also said it had no knowledge of the ongoing inquiries being conducted by the authorities.

Michael Schumacher retired from racing in 2012 after a 19-year career.

The investigation into his accident at the Meribel resort on 29 December said he had been skiing off-piste when he fell and hit a rock.

He had been going at the speed of "a very good skier" at the time, they said.

His family has said very little about his medical progress, preferring to avoid the gaze of the international media.

BBC
09/07
0 Points
1 2 3 4

Michael Schumacher files: Swiss firm 'investigated'

According to the Grenoble prosecutor, the computer was traced back to a helicopter company in the Swiss canton of Zurich. A Swiss helicopter firm is at the centre of an inquiry into attempts to sell F1 ex-champion Michael Schumacher's medical file, reports say.Schumacher, 45, was moved on 16 June from a French hospital to a hospital in Lausanne in Switzerland.

A Swiss helicopter firm is at the centre of an inquiry into attempts to sell F1 ex-champion Michael Schumacher's medical file, reports say.

Schumacher, 45, was moved on 16 June from a French hospital to a hospital in Lausanne in Switzerland.

Although he was transferred by road, initial contact was reportedly made with the helicopter company.

He suffered a severe head injury in a skiing accident last December and has come out of a medically-induced coma.

Schumacher's manager, Sabine Kehm, said last month that his medical files had been "clearly stolen" and were being offered for sale. She warned that criminal charges would be pressed if such "confidential files" were bought or published.

The medical records, said to consist of a few pages written by his doctors in the French city of Grenoble, were apparently being offered for sale to media across Europe for 50,000 euros (£40,000, $68,000).

Now French and Swiss media say the prosecutor in Grenoble is looking at a computer whose IP address has been traced to a Swiss helicopter company, which was sent the medical files while the ex-champion's doctors were considering how to transport him to Lausanne.

The latest development emerged in French newspaper Le Dauphine Libere, and Swiss media said it had been confirmed by the prosecutor in Grenoble.

Suspicions had initially fallen on the hospital in Grenoble and the ambulance team which eventually drove him across the border.

According to the Grenoble prosecutor, the computer was traced back to a helicopter company in the Swiss canton of Zurich. The company's name has not been made public.

The file had been sent to a doctor at the company, although there was nothing to link the doctor to the alleged offence.

It is thought the findings of the French inquiry will now be handed to the authorities in Switzerland.

Michael Schumacher retired from racing in 2012 after a 19-year career.

The investigation into his accident at the Meribel resort on 29 December said he had been skiing off-piste when he fell and hit a rock.

He had been going at the speed of "a very good skier" at the time, they said.

His family has said very little about his medical progress, preferring to avoid the gaze of the international media.

But Swiss media reported on Monday that Schumacher's wife Corinna had posed smiling for photographs at the weekend while visiting a horse ranch given to her by her husband.

BBC
07/07
17 Points
1 2 3 4

Michael Schumacher files: Swiss firm 'investigated'

According to the Grenoble prosecutor, the computer was traced back to a helicopter company in the Swiss canton of Zurich. A Swiss helicopter firm is at the centre of an inquiry into attempts to sell F1 ex-champion Michael Schumacher's medical file, reports say.Schumacher, 45, was moved on 16 June from a French hospital to a hospital in Lausanne in Switzerland.

A Swiss helicopter firm is at the centre of an inquiry into attempts to sell F1 ex-champion Michael Schumacher's medical file, reports say.

Schumacher, 45, was moved on 16 June from a French hospital to a hospital in Lausanne in Switzerland.

Although he was transferred by road, initial contact was reportedly made with the helicopter company.

He suffered a severe head injury in a skiing accident last December and has come out of a medically-induced coma.

Schumacher's manager, Sabine Kehm, said last month that his medical files had been "clearly stolen" and were being offered for sale. She warned that criminal charges would be pressed if such "confidential files" were bought or published.

The medical records, said to consist of a few pages written by his doctors in the French city of Grenoble, were apparently being offered for sale to media across Europe for 50,000 euros (£40,000, $68,000).

Now French and Swiss media say the prosecutor in Grenoble is looking at a computer whose IP address has been traced to a Swiss helicopter company, which was sent the medical files while the ex-champion's doctors were considering how to transport him to Lausanne.

The latest development emerged in French newspaper Le Dauphine Libere, and Swiss media said it had been confirmed by the prosecutor in Grenoble.

Suspicions had initially fallen on the hospital in Grenoble and the ambulance team which eventually drove him across the border.

According to the Grenoble prosecutor, the computer was traced back to a helicopter company in the Swiss canton of Zurich. The company's name has not been made public.

The file had been sent to a doctor at the company, although there was nothing to link the doctor to the alleged offence.

It is thought the findings of the French inquiry will now be handed to the authorities in Switzerland.

Michael Schumacher retired from racing in 2012 after a 19-year career.

The investigation into his accident at the Meribel resort on 29 December said he had been skiing off-piste when he fell and hit a rock.

He had been going at the speed of "a very good skier" at the time, they said.

His family has said very little about his medical progress, preferring to avoid the gaze of the international media.

But Swiss media reported on Monday that Schumacher's wife Corinna had posed smiling for photographs at the weekend while visiting a horse ranch given to her by her husband.

BBC
07/07
5 Points
1 2 3 4 5 6

Fighting for Schumacher's life and privacy

He was in an induced coma, and would, it was explained, gradually be woken from it at some point.Never, though, did his doctors offer a prognosis of what kind of recovery Michael Schumacher was likely to make, neither did his family comment.For his millions of fans around the world, the lack of information has been disappointing.

Since the day last December when he suffered serious head injuries in a skiing accident, the slightest mention of Michael Schumacher has attracted worldwide attention.

The former Formula 1 star, the most successful racing driver in the world, has been in hospital ever since his crash into rocks just off the marked ski slopes, but information about his actual condition has been sparse.

When news of his accident first emerged, hundreds of journalists and television crews from all over the world set up outside the hospital in Grenoble, crowding his family as they tried to visit him.

Some members of the media managed to get rooms in the same hotel as the Schumacher family; one tabloid journalist even disguised himself as a priest in an attempt to gain access to the ward in which Michael Schumacher was being treated.

Throughout, the family has pleaded for respect and privacy, while from time to time offering small nuggets of information.

At the beginning, the medical team in Grenoble gave terse press conferences, announcing that Michael's condition was life threatening, then that it had stabilised.

He was in an induced coma, and would, it was explained, gradually be woken from it at some point.

Never, though, did his doctors offer a prognosis of what kind of recovery Michael Schumacher was likely to make, neither did his family comment.

For his millions of fans around the world, the lack of information has been disappointing. They all hope that such a vigorous and relatively young man will recover, but they would also like to know more about how he really is.

Journalists, of course, wish him well too, but they are also frustrated: every mention of Schumacher trends on Twitter, every paper with him on the front page will increase its circulation, every news website featuring anything at all about him can guarantee thousands of hits.

The pressure to find something to say about him is huge.

And then, although no one likes to talk about it, there are Michael Schumacher's many sponsors, from Mercedes to mineral water, who simply do not know whether their star ambassador will ever be able to represent them again.

Nature abhors a vacuum, and, in the absence of any real information, speculation and rumour have been rife. Many newspapers have turned to brain injury specialists, some very reputable, some rather less so, to interpret, from a distance, Michael Schumacher's situation.

None of them has treated him, nevertheless many suggest they know how he is, but their diagnoses differ widely. Some forecast a good recovery, some a partial one, some no recovery at all.

The official news in April, after months of silence, that Michael Schumacher was showing some small signs of consciousness, simply fuelled the frenzy of speculation, which renewed pleas from his family and his agent could not stop.

It is not surprising then, that the decision to move him from Grenoble to the University of Lausanne hospital in Switzerland was shrouded in secrecy, and planned, it seems, with all the careful precision of a battle.

His family clearly want him closer to home: the Schumachers live on the shores of lake Geneva, just a few kilometres from Lausanne hospital. They will be able to visit him more easily, and the hospital has a renowned neurological unit, where, it was announced, Michael would continue "his long phase of rehabilitation".

The short statement telling the world that Michael Schumacher had changed hospitals also included the words "he is not in a coma anymore", adding that no further updates on his condition or his progress could be expected.

The Schumacher family clearly hoped to draw a line under the media interest, and finally get the privacy they have been requesting for six months.

A vain hope; within hours of the transfer being announced the television trucks were set up outside Lausanne hospital, scores of journalists stood outside, speculating endlessly.

Behind the scenes, more unscrupulous methods of getting information seem to be operating. Just two days after his transfer, a Swiss newspaper published a suspiciously detailed account of how Michael Schumacher had made the journey from France to Switzerland.

Not by helicopter, as one might have expected, but by an ambulance from the remote alpine community of Visp. Its crew were apparently asked to surrender their mobile phones before taking him on board, in order to prevent any pictures being taken.

But despite the precautions, "information" has seeped out: Michael's eyes were open for most of the journey, he seemed to respond to his wife.

No one knows who the source of these "facts" is, nevertheless they have been pounced on in yet more attempts to provide a spurious clarity about his condition.

And then, this week, perhaps the lowest blow of all: medical records from Grenoble hospital in France have been stolen. It is believed they are Michael Schumacher's, and that they consist of the first few pages of a much longer file, written by the doctors in Grenoble, and intended for the new medical team caring for him in Lausanne.

They are being offered for sale to media across Europe: for 50,000 euros (£40,000, $68,000) the details can be bought. And despite threats of legal action from the Schumacher family, despite a police investigation in Grenoble, even if no established media ever publish it, it is probably only a matter of time before the information emerges.

Medical records are supposed to be confidential, shared only between patient and doctor.

But not, it seems, if you are famous, not if your name is Michael Schumacher, and not in the 21st century digital age, where the perceived "right to information" seems to defeat every other consideration.

BBC
26/06
2 Points
1 2 3 4 5 6

Fighting for Schumacher's life and privacy

He was in an induced coma, and would, it was explained, gradually be woken from it at some point.Never, though, did his doctors offer a prognosis of what kind of recovery Michael Schumacher was likely to make, neither did his family comment.For his millions of fans around the world, the lack of information has been disappointing.

Since the day last December when he suffered serious head injuries in a skiing accident, the slightest mention of Michael Schumacher has attracted worldwide attention.

The former Formula 1 star, the most successful racing driver in the world, has been in hospital ever since his crash into rocks just off the marked ski slopes, but information about his actual condition has been sparse.

When news of his accident first emerged, hundreds of journalists and television crews from all over the world set up outside the hospital in Grenoble, crowding his family as they tried to visit him.

Some members of the media managed to get rooms in the same hotel as the Schumacher family; one tabloid journalist even disguised himself as a priest in an attempt to gain access to the ward in which Michael Schumacher was being treated.

Throughout, the family has pleaded for respect and privacy, while from time to time offering small nuggets of information.

At the beginning, the medical team in Grenoble gave terse press conferences, announcing that Michael's condition was life threatening, then that it had stabilised.

He was in an induced coma, and would, it was explained, gradually be woken from it at some point.

Never, though, did his doctors offer a prognosis of what kind of recovery Michael Schumacher was likely to make, neither did his family comment.

For his millions of fans around the world, the lack of information has been disappointing. They all hope that such a vigorous and relatively young man will recover, but they would also like to know more about how he really is.

Journalists, of course, wish him well too, but they are also frustrated: every mention of Schumacher trends on Twitter, every paper with him on the front page will increase its circulation, every news website featuring anything at all about him can guarantee thousands of hits.

The pressure to find something to say about him is huge.

And then, although no one likes to talk about it, there are Michael Schumacher's many sponsors, from Mercedes to mineral water, who simply do not know whether their star ambassador will ever be able to represent them again.

Nature abhors a vacuum, and, in the absence of any real information, speculation and rumour have been rife. Many newspapers have turned to brain injury specialists, some very reputable, some rather less so, to interpret, from a distance, Michael Schumacher's situation.

None of them has treated him, nevertheless many suggest they know how he is, but their diagnoses differ widely. Some forecast a good recovery, some a partial one, some no recovery at all.

The official news in April, after months of silence, that Michael Schumacher was showing some small signs of consciousness, simply fuelled the frenzy of speculation, which renewed pleas from his family and his agent could not stop.

It is not surprising then, that the decision to move him from Grenoble to the University of Lausanne hospital in Switzerland was shrouded in secrecy, and planned, it seems, with all the careful precision of a battle.

His family clearly want him closer to home: the Schumachers live on the shores of lake Geneva, just a few kilometres from Lausanne hospital. They will be able to visit him more easily, and the hospital has a renowned neurological unit, where, it was announced, Michael would continue "his long phase of rehabilitation".

The short statement telling the world that Michael Schumacher had changed hospitals also included the words "he is not in a coma anymore", adding that no further updates on his condition or his progress could be expected.

The Schumacher family clearly hoped to draw a line under the media interest, and finally get the privacy they have been requesting for six months.

A vain hope; within hours of the transfer being announced the television trucks were set up outside Lausanne hospital, scores of journalists stood outside, speculating endlessly.

Behind the scenes, more unscrupulous methods of getting information seem to be operating. Just two days after his transfer, a Swiss newspaper published a suspiciously detailed account of how Michael Schumacher had made the journey from France to Switzerland.

Not by helicopter, as one might have expected, but by an ambulance from the remote alpine community of Visp. Its crew were apparently asked to surrender their mobile phones before taking him on board, in order to prevent any pictures being taken.

But despite the precautions, "information" has seeped out: Michael's eyes were open for most of the journey, he seemed to respond to his wife.

No one knows who the source of these "facts" is, nevertheless they have been pounced on in yet more attempts to provide a spurious clarity about his condition.

And then, this week, perhaps the lowest blow of all: medical records from Grenoble hospital in France have been stolen. It is believed they are Michael Schumacher's, and that they consist of the first few pages of a much longer file, written by the doctors in Grenoble, and intended for the new medical team caring for him in Lausanne.

They are being offered for sale to media across Europe: for 50,000 euros (£40,000, $68,000) the details can be bought. And despite threats of legal action from the Schumacher family, despite a police investigation in Grenoble, even if no established media ever publish it, it is probably only a matter of time before the information emerges.

Medical records are supposed to be confidential, shared only between patient and doctor.

But not, it seems, if you are famous, not if your name is Michael Schumacher, and not in the 21st century digital age, where the perceived "right to information" seems to defeat every other consideration.

BBC
26/06
1 Points
1

People Michael Schumacher's 'medical records stolen'

We will therefore, in every single case, press for criminal charges and damages against any publication of the content or reference to the medical file."Schumacher sustained a serious brain injury when he fell and hit his head on a rock while skiing in the French Alps. The contents of any medical files are totally private and confidential and must not made available to the public.

The retired racing driver recently woke from a coma following a near-fatal skiing accident in December (13) and is currently receiving rehabilitation treatment at a facility in Switzerland after being discharged from The Grenoble University Hospital Center in France.

Schumacher's team has now issued a statement alleging documents relating to his health battle have been illegally obtained and offered for sale.

His representative Sabine Kehm says, "For several days stolen documents and data are being offered for sale. The offeror (sic) claims them to be the medical file of Michael Schumacher. We cannot judge if these documents are authentic. However, the documents are clearly stolen. The theft has been reported. The authorities are involved.

"We expressly advise that both the purchase and the publication of such documents and data are forbidden. The contents of any medical files are totally private and confidential and must not made available to the public. We will therefore, in every single case, press for criminal charges and damages against any publication of the content or reference to the medical file."

Schumacher sustained a serious brain injury when he fell and hit his head on a rock while skiing in the French Alps.

Express
24/06
9 Points
1

Urgent probe as Michael Schumacher's medical records stolen and put on sale for £40k

They claim them to be the medical file of Michael Schumacher."We cannot judge if these documents are authentic. However, the documents are clearly stolen. The theft has been reported. The authorities are involved."We expressly advise that both the purchase and the publication of such documents and data is forbidden. Vile thieves have touted the 10-page dossier for sale to media in the UK, Germany and France for a minimum of .

Vile thieves have touted the 10-page dossier for sale to media in the UK, Germany and France for a minimum of ?40,000.

The document is claimed to be the detailed discharge file compiled by medics when Schumacher left Grenoble Hospital, in France, last week to begin rehabilitation in a Swiss hospital.

The highly confidential 10-page dossier allegedly explains all of Schumacher's treatments and his evolution during his time in Grenoble, where he was airlifted on December 29 following a skiing accident in the French resort of Meribel.

The shocking offer to publications was sent in the form of an email.

It states that a potential buyer can only negotiate by email, not phone.

It also states that the transfer will be done at a lawyer's office in Switzerland and demands the buyer "to pay cash upfront to the lawyer".

The email includes an extract from the document claiming this to be proof that the dossier is authentic.

It has a price tag of 60,000 Swiss Francs, which is about ?40,000.

Schumacher's manager Sabine Kehm strongly appealed to the media not to publish the data.

She said: "As you can imagine we are horrified and disgusted."

The prosecutor in Grenoble, Jean-Yves Coquillat, confirmed that a complaint had been lodged on June 19 with police in Grenoble for the "theft and violation of medical confidentiality" by Grenoble Hospital.

Swiss lawyers acting for Schumacher have also filed a complaint.

Computers are being examined in Grenoble Hospital in a bid to determine if they have been hacked or fraudulently used to extract confidential information.

A spokeswoman at the hospital said: "We were informed by Ms Kehm that someone proposed to sell to the press a document alleging to be the medical dossier of Michael Schumacher.

The hospital has made a formal complaint to police for the "theft and violation of medical confidentiality".

Ms Kehm threatened legal action if any of the information was made public.

She said: "For several days stolen documents and data are being offered for sale. They claim them to be the medical file of Michael Schumacher.

"We cannot judge if these documents are authentic. However, the documents are clearly stolen. The theft has been reported. The authorities are involved.

"We expressly advise that both the purchase and the publication of such documents and data is forbidden. The contents of any medical files are totally private and confidential and must not made available to the public.

"We will therefore, in every single case, press for criminal charges and damages against any publication of the content or reference to the medical file. We trust for your understanding."

Schumacher was transferred from Grenoble to Lausanne on June 16 to begin rehabilitation.

He is unable to talk or walk and continues to slip in and out of consciousness.

It was 25 weeks ago that Schumacher, a very competent skier, suffered his life-threatening accident.

He was holidaying with family and friends in Meribel, where he owns a chalet.

Express
24/06
4 Points
1

Sports Schumacher medical notes stolen

He had spent nearly six months in the coma in Grenoble, where he received round-the-clock care.The notes made about his case have been stolen, though, and anyone looking to profit from them has been warned of the consequences.A statement from his management company said: "For several days stolen documents and data are being offered for sale. The offeror claims them to be the medical file of Michael Schumacher."We cannot judge if these documents are authentic.

It was confirmed last Monday that the seven-time Formula 1 World Champion had left the coma he had been in since the end of December.

Schumacher is now being treated in Switzerland as he starts his rehabilitation. He had spent nearly six months in the coma in Grenoble, where he received round-the-clock care.

The notes made about his case have been stolen, though, and anyone looking to profit from them has been warned of the consequences.

A statement from his management company said: "For several days stolen documents and data are being offered for sale. The offeror claims them to be the medical file of Michael Schumacher.

"We cannot judge if these documents are authentic. However, the documents are clearly stolen. The theft has been reported. The authorities are involved.

"We expressly advise that both the purchase and the publication of such documents and data is forbidden. The contents of any medical files are totally private and confidential and must not made available to the public.

"We will therefore, in every single case, press for criminal charges and damages against any publication of the content or reference to the medical file."

Express
24/06
3 Points
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